Posts in Texas
Texas HB 357 - "Constitutional" Carry

Texas HB 357

by Rep. Jonathan Strickland (R)

LEAP Forward Position: Oppose


Ben Philpott, KUT:

Texas allows for the concealed carry of handguns and the open carry of handguns, if owners have a license.

The state also allows for the open, unregulated carry of long guns, like the assault-style weapons like the AR-15 – meaning, you don't need a license.

Gun rights advocates have wanted the state to extend that same privilege to handguns for the last couple of years.

Currently, you have to register and take a training class to get a license to carry a handgun. But there's a push this session to eliminate that license altogether. It's a cause that state Rep. Jonathan Stickland (R-Bedford) has fought for in the both the 2015 and 2017 legislative sessions.

Texas SB 157 - Extreme Risk Protective Orders

An application for a protective order under this chapter may be filed by: a member of the respondent’s family or household; a parent, guardian, or conservator of a person who is under 18 years of age and a member of the respondent’s family or household; or a prosecuting attorney acting: on behalf of a person described by Subdivision (1) or (2); or
at the request of a peace officer.

An application must: include: detailed allegations, based on personal knowledge of a person described by Subsection (a)(1) or (2) or of a peace officer, regarding any dangerous behavior or conduct exhibited by the respondent as a result of a serious mental illness, including any behavior or conduct related to the respondent’s use of firearms; any relevant medical or mental health information concerning the respondent, including copies of relevant medical or mental health records, if available; information concerning the quantity, type, and location of any firearms the applicant believes to be in the respondent’s possession or control, if any; any other relevant facts indicating a need for a protective order; and a statement that the applicant believes the respondent poses an immediate and present danger of causing bodily injury, serious bodily injury, or death to any person, including the respondent, as a result of the respondent’s serious mental illness and access to firearms
— Article 7C.02.(a)

Ben Philpott, KUT:

HB 131 and SB 157 – State Rep. Joe Moody (D-El Paso) and state Sen. Eddie Rodriguez (D-Austin) filed bills in the House and Senate to allow courts to issue protective orders to prohibit an individual from owning, possessing or using a firearm – if that person's deemed a danger to himself or others. Family members, prosecuting attorneys and law enforcement officers can apply for the protective orders, and a judge may deem it necessary to restrict access after an examination from a mental health professional.

Texas HB 349 - Increased Rate of Fire Accessories

Texas HB 349

by Rep. Cesar Blanco (D)

LEAP Forward Position: Support


A person commits an offense if the person intentionally or knowingly possesses, manufactures, transports, repairs, or sells... a part or combination of parts that is designed and functions to increase the rate of fire of a semiautomatic rifle but does not convert the semiautomatic rifle into a machine gun.
— Section 46.05(a)(9)
Texas HB 316 - Firearm Safety and Suicide Prevention Education

The department shall develop and implement a public awareness campaign designed to encourage firearm safety and to improve public awareness on the topics of prevention of firearm accidents involving children; suicide prevention; and the safe handling and storage of firearms.

In implementing the campaign, the department may engage in online advocacy, issue public service announcements, and distribute materials that cover the topics described by Subsection (a). The department may publish its own materials or may distribute materials published by firearm safety advocacy organizations.

The department may establish a process under which an applicant for an original or renewed license under this subchapter may make a voluntary donation to support the campaign.
— Section 411.210(a-c)
Texas HB 238 - Enforcement of Federal Regulations

An agency of this state or a political subdivision of this state, and a law enforcement officer or other person employed by an agency of this state or a political subdivision of this state, may not contract with or in any other manner provide assistance to a federal agency or official with respect to the enforcement of a federal statute, order, rule, or regulation purporting to regulate a firearm, a firearm accessory, or firearm ammunition if the statute, order, rule, or regulation imposes a prohibition, restriction, or other regulation, such as a capacity or size limitation or a registration requirement, that does not exist under the laws of this state.
— Section 1.10(b)
Texas HB 195 - Firearm Sales at Gun Shows

LEAP Forward Summary: HB 195 amends Section 46.01 of the Penal Code to make it a Class A misdemeanor to “knowingly sell a firearm to another person in exchange for money or other consideration at a gun show without complying with the National Instant Criminal Background Check System … before completing the sale” or to “knowingly sell[s] a firearm to another person in exchange for money or other consideration at a gun show and … not maintain a record of the sale” with exceptions. It also extends the same culpability to the gun show operator.

Texas HB 131 - Extreme Risk Protective Orders

Summary

Provides for an Extreme Risk Protective Order which may be filed by a member of the subject’s household, parent, guardian, or prosecuting attorney acting on behalf of law enforcement. The order would require the respondent to turn over any firearms they own or possess to law enforcement and potentially surrender their handgun license pending a hearing.

Ben Philpott, KUT:

HB 131 and SB 157 – State Rep. Joe Moody (D-El Paso) and state Sen. Eddie Rodriguez (D-Austin) filed bills in the House and Senate to allow courts to issue protective orders to prohibit an individual from owning, possessing or using a firearm – if that person's deemed a danger to himself or others. Family members, prosecuting attorneys and law enforcement officers can apply for the protective orders, and a judge may deem it necessary to restrict access after an examination from a mental health professional.


Texas HB 86 - Reckless Discharge of a Firearm

Texas HB 86

by Rep. Armando Martinez (D)

LEAP Forward Position: Support


LEAP Forward Summary: Texas HB 86 would amend the penal code to create the offense of Reckless Discharge of a Firearm, and a person would be guilty of this offense if they “knowingly discharge[s] a firearm and at the time of the discharge … is reckless as to whether the firearm was aimed at the the person’s intended target or … did not have an intended target.” Breaking this law would be a Class A Misdemeanor.

Texas HB 38 - Unmarked Firearms

LEAP Forward Summary: HB 38 would require anyone who makes or assembles a homemade firearm to apply for an identifying mark - usually a serial number - from the Texas Department of Public Safety. This applies mainly to 3D printed guns and so-called “ghost guns” assembled from parts. It would also require anyone printing a 3D gun to pass a background check.